There’s never a bad time to beat Chelsea.

But Sunday’s memorable, stirring victory over the Londoners was more significant than usual for Liverpool.

It moved Jurgen Klopp’s side back to the Premier League summit. It ended a near seven-year wait for Anfield victory over the Stamford Bridge side. It stretched a remarkable unbeaten home top-flight record to 38 games.

And it also ticked another particularly sizeable box.

By downing Chelsea 2-0, Manchester City are now the only opposing side Liverpool have faced this season and not beaten.

There could yet be an opportunity to rectify that should the teams meet in the Champions League final in Madrid in June.

For that to happen, the Reds would most likely have to overcome Barcelona in the last four, although Manchester United will aim to change that in Camp Nou on Tuesday night.

Not that Jurgen Klopp and his players are looking that far ahead, of course.

Liverpool’s immediate task is to complete the job in the quarter-finals in Porto on Wednesday night having put themselves in a strong position with goals from Naby Keita and Roberto Firmino in last Tuesday’s first leg at Anfield.

The omens are encouraging.

Liverpool have never failed to progress in Europe on the 12 previous occasions they have won a first leg 2-0, while Porto have not been able to overturn such a deficit on the four times they have faced it.

And when the Reds last met Porto in a quarter-final, they went on to lift a European trophy, the UEFA Cup, in 2001.

Porto weren't happy with this challenge by Liverpool's Mohamed Salah on Danilo Pereira
Porto weren’t happy with this challenge by Liverpool’s Mohamed Salah on Danilo Pereira (Image: Robbie Jay Barratt – AMA/Getty Images)

The team they beat in the semi-final? Barcelona.

Revenge is some way down the line but the tantalising prospect of another crack at City in six weeks offers a further layer of intrigue to a Champions League campaign that, despite the highs of wins over Paris Saint-Germain, Napoli and Bayern Munich, has flown under the radar in recent weeks.

The Premier League has, understandably, dominated.

Liverpool’s win over Chelsea was their 26th Premier League victory of the season to equal the record set under Brendan Rodgers five years ago, while the last time the Reds won more times in a top-flight season came with the 30 they accrued when lifting the title in 1978-79.

Indeed, they stand only one point off their best-ever Premier League tally with four games still remaining.

If last week’s surprisingly straightforward first leg allowed Liverpool a breather from their domestic endeavours, there will no such comfort zone in the Estadio do Dragao.

Porto, should their president Jorge Nuno Pinto da Costa be any gauge, are burning with a sense of injustice, believing Mohamed Salah fortunate to escape a red card when catching Danilo Pereira on the shin and claiming they should have had at least one penalty at Anfield.

The fixture is a 50,000 sell-out and, as Liverpool discovered on their visit last season, the home fans can whip up a frenzied atmosphere, while Porto are bolstered by the return of Hector Herrera and wind-up merchant Pepe.

It won’t be easy. But Liverpool will be confident they can take a step nearer Champions League glory – and a possible further City scrap.